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Book Cover for: Ethnicity Counts, William Petersen

Ethnicity Counts

William Petersen

Official statistics about ethnicity in advanced societies are no better than those in less developed countries

Book Details

  • Publisher: Routledge
  • Publish Date: Jan 31st, 1997
  • Pages: 340
  • Language: English
  • Dimensions: 9.00in - 6.00in - 0.81in - 1.37lb
  • EAN: 9781560002963
  • Categories: Anthropology - Cultural & SocialDemographyCultural & Ethnic Studies - General

About the Author

Petersen, William: -

William Petersen is Robert Lazarus Professor of Social Demography Emeritus at Ohio State University and is known throughout the profession as a leading demographer. His work has appeared in Population and Development Review, Annual Review of Sociology, and Demography.

Praise for this book

"William Petersen has been for many years now our sharpest analyst of how the US Census handles or mishandles the problems of counting by race, ethnicity, ancestry, and the like. These issues become more and more important as counts of racial and ethnic groups are used to make policy, assert demands, generalize on the impact of immigration on American society. This book is invaluable as a resource on how we have handled these issues for now two centuries, and for insights into how we might handle them better."

--Nathan Glazer, professor of education and sociology, Harvard University

"The kinds of classifications by ethnicity and race undertaken by statistical and census authorities are both important and impossible to get right... Ethnicity Counts provides a sobering reality test for data on ethnicity that have increasingly become central to controversial public policies relating to apportionment, voting, employment, and admission to universities."

--Michael S. Teitelbaum, Population and Development Review

"Ethnicity Counts is an account of the imperfect mechanisms used to "count" ethnicity, while stressing the continuing importance of ethnicity (that is, ethnicity still "counts") despite the inherent flaws in tabulating a moving target... Petersen's book is an interesting read on an extremely important topic."

--Grace Kao, International Migration Review

"William Petersen has been for many years now our sharpest analyst of how the US Census handles or mishandles the problems of counting by race, ethnicity, ancestry, and the like. These issues become more and more important as counts of racial and ethnic groups are used to make policy, assert demands, generalize on the impact of immigration on American society. This book is invaluable as a resource on how we have handled these issues for now two centuries, and for insights into how we might handle them better."

--Nathan Glazer, professor of education and sociology, Harvard University

-The kinds of classifications by ethnicity and race undertaken by statistical and census authorities are both important and impossible to get right... Ethnicity Counts provides a sobering reality test for data on ethnicity that have increasingly become central to controversial public policies relating to apportionment, voting, employment, and admission to universities.-

--Michael S. Teitelbaum, Population and Development Review

-Ethnicity Counts is an account of the imperfect mechanisms used to -count- ethnicity, while stressing the continuing importance of ethnicity (that is, ethnicity still -counts-) despite the inherent flaws in tabulating a moving target... Petersen's book is an interesting read on an extremely important topic.-

--Grace Kao, International Migration Review

-William Petersen has been for many years now our sharpest analyst of how the US Census handles or mishandles the problems of counting by race, ethnicity, ancestry, and the like. These issues become more and more important as counts of racial and ethnic groups are used to make policy, assert demands, generalize on the impact of immigration on American society. This book is invaluable as a resource on how we have handled these issues for now two centuries, and for insights into how we might handle them better.-

--Nathan Glazer, professor of education and sociology, Harvard University