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Book Cover for: Lessons for Survival: Mothering Against "The Apocalypse", Emily Raboteau

Lessons for Survival: Mothering Against "The Apocalypse"

Emily Raboteau

Reader Score

86%

86% of readers

recommend this book

Critic Reviews

Good

Based on 6 reviews on

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Award-winning author and critic Emily Raboteau crafts a powerfully moving meditation on race, climate, environmental justice--and what it takes to find shelter.

Lessons for Survival is a probing series of pilgrimages from the perspective of a mother struggling to raise her children to thrive without coming undone in an era of turbulent intersecting crises.

With camera in hand, Raboteau goes in search of birds, fluttering in the air or painted on buildings, and city parks where her children may safely play while avoiding pollution, pandemics, and the police. She ventures abroad to learn from Indigenous peoples, and in her own family and community, she discovers the most intimate examples of resilience. Raboteau bears witness to the inner life of Black womanhood, motherhood, the brutalities and possibilities of cities, while celebrating the beauty and fragility of nature. This innovative work of reportage and autobiography stitches together multiple stories of protection, offering a profound sense of hope.

Book Details

  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Company
  • Publish Date: Mar 12nd, 2024
  • Pages: 304
  • Language: English
  • Dimensions: 8.70in - 5.90in - 1.30in - 1.10lb
  • EAN: 9781250809766
  • Categories: African American & BlackEnvironmental Conservation & Protection - GeneralParenting - Motherhood

About the Author

Raboteau, Emily: - Emily Raboteau writes at the intersection of social and environmental justice, race, climate change, and parenthood. Her previous books are Searching for Zion (2013), winner of an American Book Award and finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and the cult classic novel, The Professor's Daughter (2005). Since the release of the 2018 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, she has focused on writing about the climate crisis. A contributing editor at Orion Magazine and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, Raboteau's essays have recently appeared and been anthologized in the New Yorker, the New York Times, New York Magazine, The Nation, Best American Science Writing, Best American Travel Writing, and elsewhere. Her distinctions include an inaugural Climate Narratives Prize from Arizona State University, the Deadline Club Award in Feature Reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists' New York chapter, and grants and fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Bronx Council on the Arts, the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, the Lannan Foundation and Yaddo. She serves regularly as nonfiction faculty at the Bread Loaf Environmental Writing Conference and is a full professor at the City College of New York (CUNY) in Harlem, once known as "the poor man's Harvard." She lives in the Bronx with her husband, the novelist Victor LaValle, and their two children.

Critics’ reviews