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Book Cover for: Tales from the Kathasaritsagara, Somadeva

Tales from the Kathasaritsagara

Somadeva

Literally translated as "ocean of the sea of stories, " the Kathasaritasagara is a collection of stories of the ancient Hindu world. It was written by Somadeva in the 11th century. Unlike those more familiar classics, this work contains no hidden moral lessons. Instead, it is an uninhibited and beautiful celebration of earthly life.

Book Details

  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  • Publish Date: Oct 16th, 2023
  • Pages: 248
  • Language: English
  • Dimensions: 9.00in - 6.00in - 0.69in - 1.18lb
  • EAN: 9781538184257
  • Categories: HinduAsian - Indic

About the Author

Arshia Sattar works with myths, epics and the story traditions of the Indian sub-continent, most particularly with the Sanskrit text of Valmiki's Ramayana. She writes about and teaches classical Indian literatures at various institutions in India and abroad and has recently published books based on Hindu myths and epics for younger readers. Her previous acclaimed translations at Rowman & Littlefield include Valmiki's Uttara Kanda: The Book of Answers and Valmiki's Ramayana.

Praise for this book

Arshia Sattar's wonderful translation in a language of our times lets us experience the worldliness of the Kathasaritsagara whose framed tales invite us to re-imagine Indian pasts through a breathless and breathtaking diversity of beings and creatures, castes, religions, pursuits, and outcomes. Sattar's seasoned introduction, in her characteristically fresh voice, engages tantalizing questions of authorship, textuality, genre, and transmission, and draws both the connoisseur and the newcomer into the complex, interwoven, and sensuous world of Indian storytelling. An eclipsed classic can now be relished anew.

Arshia Sattar's artful translation of Somadeva Bhatta's Tales From the Kathasaritsagara brings this 11th century Sanskrit classic to life for today's readers. The original Sanskrit verse is often described as "simple but elegant." This would also describe Sattar's wonderful translation. These highly entertaining tales of princes, kings, celestial beings, courtesans, and everyday men and women provide the reader with a compelling picture of life in South Asia during the time in which they were written.