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Book Cover for: The Grimoire Encyclopaedia: Volume 2: A convocation of spirits, texts, materials, and practices, David Rankine

The Grimoire Encyclopaedia: Volume 2: A convocation of spirits, texts, materials, and practices

David Rankine

The Grimoire Encyclopaedia is a work of unparalleled magical scholarship which expands the field of grimoire study far beyond its previous boundaries. Including one hundred chapters on individual grimoires and important books, a table of the spirits found in those books, and fourteen appendixes, these two volumes provide a fresh panoramic view and the most extensive collection of resources ever collected on the grimoire tradition.


If you ever wanted to know what types of magic circles can be found in Magia Naturalis et Innaturalis, or what kind of feast to prepare for the Lady of the Mountain, or what kind of operation a brass nail is used for, all of this and more can be found in Volume 2, which includes appendices on incenses and oils, metals, plants, circles, feasts, and more.


Stephen Skinner calls The Grimoire Encyclopaedia 'a work of incredible scholarship by someone who truly understands his subject...' that 'deserves to be on the bookshelves of all magicians and scholars of grimoire studies.'


David Rankine offers a comprehensive system of exploring the grimoires, from the intensive spirit list to a detailed look at magical tools, magic circles, and more. Spanning hundreds of years and including texts both familiar and strange, this resource will become an instant classic in the field of grimoire studies.

Book Details

  • Publisher: Hadean Press Limited
  • Publish Date: Apr 25th, 2023
  • Pages: 676
  • Language: English
  • Dimensions: 10.00in - 7.00in - 1.36in - 2.54lb
  • EAN: 9781914166372
  • Categories: OccultismEncyclopediasReference

About the Author

Rankine, David: - David Rankine is an author, esoteric researcher and magician who lives in England with his partner, artist and tattooist Rosa Laguna. He has been making major contributions to the modern occult revival since the 1980s through lectures, workshops, presentations, articles, and books. His esoteric expertise covers a wide range of topics, including the Western Esoteric Traditions, especially the Qabalah, the Grimoire tradition, Greco-Egyptian magic and Ceremonial Magic, as well as British Folklore and European Mythology. His published work in recent years has been characterised by the publication of previously unavailable or inaccessible material on the grimoires and other areas of magic. The Grimoire Encyclopaedia is the result of David's years of study and practice with the grimoires.

Praise for this book

Grimoires are the practical texts of magic, written in most cases by practitioners. They are therefore central to understanding how magic really works. Before the twenty-first century, the number of grimoires in print was limited, but in the last quarter of a century, many more have been discovered in manuscript and appeared in print. Keeping track of all of them has become a difficult task.


David Rankine has solved this difficulty with his most recent book, the massive two-volume Grimoire Encyclopaedia: a convocation of spirits, texts, materials, and practices. This is a work of incredible scholarship by someone who truly understands his subject. David documents and explains more than one hundred individual grimoires, their history, and their makeup, setting them in the continuum of experimental magic. Volume 1 provides the most extensive collection of resources ever gathered on the grimoire tradition along with a spirit list of all the catalogued grimoires. The fourteen huge appendixes in Volume 2 include a survey of magical tools, magic circles, and much more. Spanning hundreds of years and including both familiar grimoires and others virtually unknown until recently, these books are certainly destined to become a key classic in the field. They deserve to be on the bookshelves of all magicians and scholars of grimoire studies.


When David and I came up with the idea of creating a series of publications called Sourceworks of Ceremonial Magic in 1999, we thought that maybe we could publish most of the key grimoires in the first ten to fifteen or so volumes of the series. Little did we realise how many grimoires were resting in private collections or libraries around the world, often hidden under other names or even deliberately miscatalogued. It is only with the advent of The Grimoire Encyclopaedia that the huge scope of these grimoires becomes visible.


--Stephen Skinner, Golden Hoard Press